Helping Your Teenager Reduce Her Risk Of Developing Skin Cancer

Skin cancer can be a debilitating disease. It can lead to widespread problems, and in some cases, death. The Skin Cancer Foundation explains that melanoma, one of the deadliest of skin cancers, contributes up to three percent of all childhood cancers. The key is preventative techniques and early detection to help eradicate the cancer or push it into remission. Here are a few ways that you can help your pre-teen or teen help reduce her risk of developing various forms of skin cancer. Know Your Risk Factors Some teenagers are more prone to skin cancers than others, and not just because they may have spent more time out in the sun. Here are some tell-tale signs that may put your pre-teen at risk for developing cancer now or years from now. This includes: A family history of skin cancer Previous removal of a suspicious or pre-cancerous skin lesion History of sunburns early on in life Skin that reddens easily Freckled skin, moles, birthmarks or uneven skin tones Very light skin color Green or blue eye color Red or blond hair Taking these risks into consideration is something that you should share with your teen. From there, she can take the necessary steps throughout life to keep her skin protected from the sun. UV Protection Reducing your risk and your teen’s risk of developing skin cancer starts with avoiding direct sunlight without adequate protection. Choose a waterproof sunscreen that will stay in place throughout the day while she’s enjoying the outdoors. There are also several daily moisturizing lotions as well as makeup foundations that also contain SPF protection. Remember to tell your teen that anytime she walks outdoors, she’s exposing her skin to some sort of UV radiation. Dermatology Consultation An initial consultation with a dermatologist is imperative, especially if your teen has had a lot of sun exposure since birth. A dermatologist will be able to examine the condition of your teenager’s skin and look for skin or mole irregularities that may indicate a precancerous lesion. From there, your doctor will recommend what interval he would like to see her back in for a visit. Recognizing Cancer It’s important to be able to recognize what is a common skin discoloration and what is something more serious, like cancer. There are three main types: Basal cell carcinoma- a slow growing cancer that rarely spreads to other organs. Squamous cell carcinoma-a slow growing cancer that can spread and should be treated right away. Melanoma- a fast spreading type of cancer that can quickly spread to vital organs. When looking for signs of any type of cancer. Remember the ABCD and E’s. Asymmetry- One side of the mole is not identical to the other. Border- The edges of a mole are irregular or blurred. Color- Different colors lie within the mole. Diameter- The overall diameter is larger than the head of a...

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Everyone Fights! 4 Ways You Can Fight Fairly With Your Spouse

Every couple fights. In fact, if a couple doesn’t fight, it might be construed as a sign that the relationship is unhealthy, at least when it comes to communication. Disagreements with other people are a fact of life. If a couple never argues or disagrees with each other, it’s more probable that someone in the relationship is avoiding conflict by not voicing their needs or opinions. It’s healthy to talk about your needs, ideas, and frustrations with your partner. It’s also healthy to fight. However, fighting can quickly become unhealthy and, in some cases, abusive, if you don’t fight fairly. Following are four ways you can fight fairly with your spouse. Don’t Place Blame Arguments quickly spiral out of control when one or both partners are simply blaming one another for the issue being discussed. To come to a quick resolution, avoid placing the blame on your partner. Instead, only talk about the issue and how it makes you feel. If your partner doesn’t feel attacked, they will be more likely to understand where you’re coming from and take steps toward resolution.  Don’t Talk Disrespectfully You love and respect your partner, so you should always treat them with love and respect. Do not call them names, yell at them, or speak disrespectfully to them. If you find yourself responding emotionally, walk away. If you say hurtful things during an argument, those words will remain in your partner’s memory long after you’ve both forgotten what the fight was about in the first place. Those words, not the issue at hand, can drive a wedge between the two of you.   Don’t Revisit the Past Each fight shouldn’t be a rehashing of everything that’s happened during your entire relationship. Do not bring up past problems unless they are about the exact issue you’re discussing. Try to focus on the issue at hand. Remember, the goal of any fight is to come to a resolution or understanding. The goal isn’t to make your partner feel bad.  Don’t Prolong Fight Don’t prolong the fight. Once you’ve said what you have to say and your partner has said what they have to say, walk away from each other or move on to another topic that you both will enjoy talking about.  The key to a healthy relationship is to learn how to fight fairly. You’re going to have fights and conflict in any relationship. Don’t avoid them; learn how to have them respectfully. For more helpful tips, contact a counselor like Sharon O’Connell,...

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